Bulldog Deaths on Airplanes

The government has forced the airlines to release information on the number
of pet deaths during air travel and the outlook is very grim for Bulldogs.
Of the 122 deaths over 50% were flat-nosed breeds with the Bulldog leading
the pack at 25 deaths.  Pugs were next with 11, followed by Frenchies.

Personally I would never fly my Bulldog in the cargo area of an airplane.  My
cousin was a pilot who first alerted me to the high number of dog deaths that
were never released to the public.

For the reasons why a Bulldog is so susceptible to death, read this FAQS page
from the American Veterinarian Medical Association:
http://www.avma.org/animal_health/short-nosed_dogs_air_travel_faq.asp

Here’s an excerpt:

“brachycephalic breeds are prone to respiratory problems because, although they have shortened noses, they still have to pack all of the same anatomical structures in there that dogs with longer snouts do. Just because their snouts are shorter doesn’t mean they’re missing any parts – they still have to pack nasal passages, sinuses, and a hard palate into that small area. It’s sort of like moving from a house to an apartment and having to put the same amount of furniture in the apartment – it’s all there, but it can be a bit cramped. The situation is worsened if the dog is overweight or obese.”

And one more – I couldn’t have said it better:

“As a result of the tighter space, they are prone to problems such as smaller-than-normal nostrils, a longer-than-normal soft palate, and a narrowed trachea (or windpipe). Because of these abnormalities, they don’t breathe as efficiently as dogs with normal-length snouts and can have difficulty cooling off when they’re playing or exercising, or if they’re stressed or overheated. And when they’re stressed, their airway can actually collapse (either partially or completely) and cut off their airflow.”

You can also watch this related short video:
http://www.avmatv.org/media.cfm?c=761&m=3503&s=68&

It’s just another one of those Bulldog things.  When I travel with Archie, I
drive.  Mostly I just leave him at home where he’s happiest with the same
reliable dog sitter every time I leave.

divider