Bulldog Puppy Scams – What to Look Out For

If you’re like me, you are always on the lookout for
English Bulldogs.  Whether you own one or want to own
one, this article reveals many of the most common scams
we bulldog lovers run across when searching for a
new bulldog, especially when we don’t want to
pay full price!

I ran across this on FrogDog, a blog devoted to French
Bulldogs, but it definitely applies to English Bulldogs as well.

There are several tactics these unscrupulous people
use to lure us in and steal our money and our trust, including:

  • Bait and switch puppy scam
  • Phantom Puppy Wire Transfer scam
  • Big Bank Draft Puppy Purchase Scam
  • The Lost Pet Scam
  • The “Adopt or Rescue a French Bulldog or English Bulldog” Scam
  • The Little Bit of Both Scam – “Shelter” needs donations, and has too many adorable puppies..

To read the full details, click here

And always remember that old saying “when something seems too good to be true,
it probably is” and don’t let your heart take over your wallet when looking for a Bulldog.
your bulldog pal,
Jan

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Bulldog Water Puppies: Is this Normal?

do bulldogs usually have a water puppies in all their litters?

–Rosa

Hi Rosa,

I hear of them pretty frequently, sometimes all the puppies are
water puppies, but I would not say it is normal to have one in
each litter.

A “water puppy” is a puppy born alive that has retained a lot of
fluids and looks bloated and larger than normal.  Water puppies
may die soon after birth because the excess fluid starts to fill
up the puppy’s lungs and he will suffocate.

This type of disorder is more common in the flat faced breeds
such as English Bulldogs, Frenchies, Boston Terriers, and Pugs.

If your vet does an ultrasound of the puppies about 30 days into
the pregnancy, many of these cases can be detected and action
taken to remedy the problem by putting the bitch on a low salt
diet (under your vet’s supervision).

Treatment needs to be immediate, which is one reason to have
bulldog puppies birthed by c-section at your vet’s facility.

If you have a water puppy, immediately raise the puppy’s head
and extend the neck to allow for better air intake into the lungs.
Massage the puppy’s genitals to encourage urination.

A shot of Lasix can be given to encourage urination – use caution
as too much can cause dehydration.

Many of these puppies can survive if they are treated quickly and
vigilantly.  If they survive three days then they will usually go on
to have normal lives.

your bulldog pal,

Jan

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