Gotta Love This Little Girl

Gotta love this little English Bulldog Gal, from blogger I am Your Canadian Boyfriend

pretty little girl by Your Canadian Boyfriend

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Swelling on My Bulldog’s Ear Flap

Hi Jan,

We have not spoke in a while I hope all is well with you and you bully.  I have a concern that I wonder if you could help me with. I noticed this morning a swelling or puffiness in my bully’s ear. I called my Vet but he won’t be in until tomorrow. When I described what I saw to the nurse she said she is pretty sure it is a hematoma and that he would need surgery.

I am very scared of surgery because I know how risky it is with Bulldogs. I have been reading all kinds of things on the internet, one thing I read was that old fashioned Vets don’t rush into surgery they suggest boiling water and adding sea salt and bathing the ear every hour, or using witch hazel.  Do you know anything about this and can you give me any advise on what I should do I am very frightened.

Thanks,  Your Bully Friend, JoAnn

—-

Hi JoAnn,

It sounds like it’s an aural hematoma which will probably need to be drained if it doesn’t go away using the methods you know about.  It can be caused by either an insect bite, ear mites, an ear infection, or from being irritated by scratching and/or injuring the small blood vessels in the ear flap.

I think you need to have it looked at to find out what it is and proceed from there.

It would not be a surgery that should require being under anesthesia very long.  There is always a risk but if your vet is familiar with bulldogs and knows which type of anesthesia to use and the smaller breathing tubes, and if your dog is in good health, it should go fine.

You should ask him about the cures you’ve heard of.

Here’s some information on aural hematomas from The American College if Veterinarian Surgeons

Overview

An aural hematoma is a collection of blood within the cartilage plate of the ear and the skin and usually arises as a self-inflicted injury from scratching and head shaking.

Causes

Underlying causes include all conditions that result in otitis externa (infection of the external ear canal). Hematoma formation has also been associated with increased capillary fragility (e.g., as seen with Cushing’s disease).

Incidence and Prevalence

Aural hematoma is the most common result of physical injury to the pinna (the “flap” of the ear). The condition is common in dogs with chronic otitis externa, and less common in cats.

Signs and Symptoms

Swelling associated with aural hematoma is most apparent on the concave inner surface of the pinna. (Figure 1) The swelling is soft and warm in the early stages. With chronicity, fibrosis and contraction will thicken and deform the ear, resulting in a cauliflower contracture.

Risk Factors

Sources of irritation to the ear have been implicated in the development of aural hematoma. These include inflammation, parasites, allergies, and foreign bodies. Most patients usually have an associated otitis externa. Recurrence of the condition is common if the underlying condition is not resolved.

Treatment Options

Treatment options included needle aspiration and bandages, tube drainage systems and incisional drainage.  Apposition between the tissues should be restored and maintained with bandages, with fibrin sealants, with the aid of sutures, or with tissue welding using laser.  The goals of surgery are to remove the hematoma, prevent recurrence, and retain the natural appearance of the ears.

Let me know what you decide.

your bulldog pal,

Jan

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Let Your Baby Snuggle & Kiss Your Bulldog

When I was a child we had lots of pets.  My mom loved cats and I even go to see kittens born!  We also had a couple dogs.  Alas, none were bulldogs – my love affair with English Bulldogs started when I was an adult! None of us suffered from allergies and now science may have discovered why!

I read this post from Dr Marty Becker, from his new book The Healing Power of Pets

New evidence suggests that exposure to pets early in life might actually help the body build defenses against allergies and asthma, thereby protecting children from developing reactions, rather than triggering them.

“Kids exposed to animals seemed to be better off,” said Christine Johnson, Ph.D., a senior research epidemiologist with the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. Christine Johnson’s study… tracked 833 children over seven years and found that exposure to two or more cats and dogs at one year of age made children less susceptible to other allergy-inducing substances by the time they turned seven, and that the exposure even improved some boys’ lung functions.

Other research since then has supported these findings, but it’s not just allergens; it’s germs, too. It’s part of what’s known as the “hygeine hypothesis,” the idea that as standards of household cleanliness have been raised, children are being exposed to fewer and fewer germs and allergens, and their immune systems are not as robust as they would be if raised with dust, dirt, farm animals and, of course, “snakes and snails and puppy dog tails.”

One important note: It’s very important that you start early. If you have pets from birth or as toddlers, great. If you wait until you’re a teenager to get a pet to reduce allergies or asthma, not only does it not work, it may make these conditions worse.

Find out about Marty’s book at this link The Healing Power of Pets

And be sure to let your small children cuddle with your bulldog – it’s good for both of them!

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Bulldog Dry Crusty Chapped Nose – a Solution

Hi Jan,

regarding the bully nose, I noticed that it gets very dry
so i started to put vaseline on it and now it seems as
though his nose is shedding itself and black parts of
his nose are peeling, do you have any suggestions??

====

Interesting you should ask about the dry nose.
I just tried this great product that contains shea butter, (NO petroleum
products like vaseline) and it works great.  You only need to use a small
amount.  The difference in my bulldog’s nose was significant in only one
week’s use!  Here’s a link to the product: http://tinyurl.com/yg3427l
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Toxic Beds & Toys – No Government Standards on Dog Toys

In case we don’t have enough to worry about with our Bulldogs
and their allergic reactions to things in the environment . . .

There is virtually no government oversight in
the manufacture of pet toys.  In fact there are no safety
requirements like there are in children’s toys.  No government
standards for hazardous chemicals.  Consequently there can be
high levels of lead and other harmful chemicals in your
dog beds and toys.

An organization called Healthy Stuff has just released a list
of dog beds and toys with ratings as to how much lead or other
hazardous materials are used in the manufacture.

It’s an eye-opener!

Especially toxic are half of the tennis balls tested!  And lots of dog
beds – that’s a lot of exposure for the hours your bulldog sleeps.
I suppose I should be somewhat relieved to find that Kong toys
are on the “low” list, but why should they have any toxins.

Take a look – it’s in alphabetical order by manufacturer:
http://www.healthystuff.org/departments/pets/product.least.php

If you are really concerned you can write the government or
the manufacturer of your favorite products.  If they get
enough mail they do listen.

I’m glad there are folks concerned enough to test these products
and let us know.

On a lighter note, Archie and I wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving!
Our bulldogs give us so much to be thankful for!

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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Bulldog has “red ball” growth – prolapsed urethra?

Hi Jan!

I just recently found your blog and thought you could help me.
My boy Tank has a red ball at the end of his pe*nis that is  about the size
of a small grape. It doesn’t seem to be bothering him at all and it’s not
affecting urination that I can tell. It’s been there for a while and doesn’t
seem to be getting better. We live in the arctic and won’t have access to
a vet till we go on vacation in November. Tank is otherwise very healthy.
Additional details- He’s 19 months old and he’s fixed. Should I be worried?

Thanks, Tank’s Mom Morena

Hi Morena,

It sounds like Tank may have what’s called a prolapsed urethra, which
is fairly common in bulldogs.  Sometimes this results in bleeding if
a small blood vessel breaks.  Since he’s stable you are probably ok
for now but you should see a specialist vet (urologist) as soon as
possible for a proper diagnosis.

Here’s an article on the subject:
http://www.dvmnews.com/dvm/Diagnotes/How-would-you-manage-a-prolapsed-urethra-in-an-Eng/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/372887

Vets used to amputate the end of the penis to fix this problem but there
is a new and very easy, non-invasive procedure now that does not mutilate
the dog, but tacks the urethra back into the penis.  It’s called a Urethropexy,
and it only takes about 15 minutes to perform:
http://www.jaaha.org/cgi/content/abstract/38/4/381

I hope this helps.  Please let me know how it goes.

Your Bulldog Pal,
Jan

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English Bulldog on a Sailboat – is this okay?

When I finish my schooling I am planning on traveling long-term by sailboat (cruising) to various parts of the world, starting with the Caribbean. At first my immediate thought was, “A bulldog should be better suited to a 42 foot sailboat than any other breed, seeing as how they are mild-mannered dogs who just lie around most of the time. Until I bought your book I didn’t really grasp just how serious heat stroke is in bulldogs. I knew they were more prone to overheating, but I had no idea they could develop heat stroke in 80 degree weather. That’s what really shocked me. We have air conditioning in the sailboat, but only when we are plugged into a marina. When out sailing the air can’t run off batteries of even wind or solar power. So we are pretty much limited to fans in warm weather while under way. This is the only thing that poses a real problem in my getting an english bulldog. I don’t believe exercise would be a problem because we would spend more time in marinas than sailing, so going for walks wouldn’t be an issue. The thing is when we are sailing from one location to the next, would my bulldog overheat in the warmer hours of the day? This is killing me! I am in love with sailing, and I am in love with english bulldogs. I just can’t bring myself to choose one or the other. I just wish there was some way the two could go together and keep my bulldog comfortable as well. This is why I was curious about miniature bulldogs. But I am really only interested in the english bulldog. I have seen various products that aid in keeping your dog cool in warm weather such as cooling pads that the dog lies on, cooling bandanas, cooling vests, etc. Do you think it is possible to keep a bulldog cool on a sailboat with no A/C, but lots of cool shade in the cockpit and of course in the cabin if we avoid temperatures over 90 degrees while keeping fans on the bulldog during warmer hours of the day, along with lots of cool freshwater for him to drink, possibly a cooling pad for him to lie on, maybe even a kiddie pool in the cockpit for him to lie in? What I’m saying is I am willing to do anything to make it possible to keep an english bulldog comfortable on a sailboat. Keep in mind it would only be warm in the afternoon hours while making a short 1-2 day crossing from one location to the next. The majority of the time we would be in a marina running the A/C. I would worship this dog, and would never leave him in a situation that may harm him. And if it is absolutely impossible to keep a bulldog cool and comfortable with no A/C for a couple of days at a time, then I would do the responsible thing and not get a bulldog, even though it would break my heart.

What is your view on my situation? Any advice you can offer will be greatly appreciated.

–Lori

Hi Lori

In your situation I think you could manage a bulldog.
I’d be especially careful in choosing one with minimal
breathing problems – this requires careful research of breeders.

Then if you keep your bulldog in the shade with a breeze and possibly
a cooling vest or wet t-shirt, he should be ok.  Stuffy heat or
ourdoors over 80 just laying around is very dangerous.
A cooling pad would also be a good idea.

And you could also invest in a life jacket for your bulldog.  They
do not really swim well because of the large head and chest.
But they do love the water, so a life line attached to a harness
would also be a good idea.
I live in Denver and when it gets over 80 degrees inside my home,
I notice that my Archie starts to lay around and sometimes just
pants.  I turn on the air conditioning for him when it gets this warm.
He’ll gravitate to the cool tiles and hardwood floor in the heat, and
avoids his fleece bed.

Sometimes I take my Archie outside when it’s 90-something and
I’m hosing down the deck.  I host him down too, but I don’t let
him run around for more than 10 minutes.  And I keep a very
close eye on him.

You can tell when they start to overheat.  They start panting
really hard with tongue extended way out.  Or they vomit.
This are both signs to take action immediately in cooling
them off.

A bulldog can overheat in the winter if they get too excited
and run around the house with other dogs.  I’ve had this
happen with Archie at Thanksgiving.  But I can tell because
he starts to pant.  They don’t know they can’t keep up with
the other dogs!

I have heard of many bulldog deaths where some ignorant
owner has their dog chasing them while they mow the lawn.
The dog collapses and dies before they can get them to the
vet.  But this is because they did not know about the over-
heating.

Anyway if you are knowledgeable about the symptoms and
if you just observe you will learn pretty quickly what your bulldog’s
limits are.

So I think you’ll be fine sailing the seas!  It would make a good
news story!

Let me know when you get one.

your bulldog pal,

Jan

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My English Bulldog is Throwing Up a Lot . . .

Hi Jan,
I was wondering if you could help me? Gracie my bulldog seems to throw up alot.
Is there something I can do? Do you think there is something wrong with her?
I am very worried about her..
Thanks so much,
Janice
—-
Hi Janice,

It depends on what sort of vomiting.
There is a difference between vomiting and regurgitation.
If your dog is simply throwing up food right after eating,
food that has not been in the stomach, it is probably simple
regurgitation.

Bulldogs tend to gulp their food and sometimes eat so fast
that the food can’t get down the esophagus properly and
so they throw up.

There is a condition common in bulldogs called esophageal
motility disorder, where the normal constrictions of the
esophagus don’t work properly and cause the bulldog to
not “swallow” properly and often regurgitate.

There is a simple way to alleviate this condition that I
recommend in my book.  Elevate your bulldog’s food
dish.  This lets gravity take over and help get the food
down her throat.

To soothe an upset stomach you can feed her a little
canned pumpkin with her food – be sure it is pure
pumpkin and NOT pumpkin pie mix which is loaded
with sugar.

There are, however, other things that can cause vomiting,
including food allergies, metabolic disorders, ulcers, or
even obstructions in the throat, or if she has something
lodged in her stomach like a rawhide bone or teddy bear.

If you suspect she has eaten the stuffing out of a teddy
bear or a similar item, you can withhold her food for
about 7-8 hours.  Then give her some white bread with
the crust cut off.  It’s really gooey and can catch
what’s clogging her and pass it through.

Be sure she gets small amounts of water frequently
or sucks on an ice cube to keep her from getting
dehydrated.  Then give her a couple pieces of white
bread, broken up into small pieces.  This will bind with
the stuffing and allow it to pass through.  If she throws
this up as well, call your vet immediately.

Vomiting is characterized by the dog heaving for a while
before the stomach contents come up.  When they do, they
may also come through her nose.

If your dog has been vomiting blood or bile, you need to
take her to the vet right away.  Vomiting is dehydrating
which is very dangerous long term.

Throwing up can be an indication of serious illness in
the liver or kidneys or pancreas.  Your vet should be
able to do some simple tests to determine this.

If your bulldog has been “vomiting” for several days,
if she is still doing so, I think it advisable to take her to
the vet to make sure she does not have anything lodged in
her stomach or esophagus.  And make sure it is not a more
serious illness.

I hope this helps.  Let me know if you need some clarification.

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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Continuing Controversy over AKC Breed Standards

Nightline produced a controversial piece on the
breed standard practices promoted by the AKC,
following the controversy over breeding that started
in the UK.

Of course they feature the Bulldog as a prime example
of inbred genetically caused health issues.

You can see the video here:
http://abcnews.go.com/video/playerIndex?id=7064046

I have mixed feelings about this because I love my
bulldogs and the Bulldog breed, but I have had a very
compromised bulldog and I also hear so many
sad stories from people who have sickly bulldogs.

It’s unfortunate that our breed has to be one of the
targets for criticism but I’m afraid it’s also well documented
how many health problems they have.

So go watch the video and hug your bulldog!

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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Can I Have a Pond In the Yard if I Have a Bulldog?

Hi Jan,

I have a question is it possible to have a bulldog with a water pond inthe back yard??? or is it to ricky to have the bulldog in a house that has a water pond???

–Laura

Hey Laura,

You can have a pond if it’s not deep enough that your bulldog
cannot stand up.  Bulldogs cannot swim and if the water is too
deep, if he fell in you would risk losing him.

You can put a barrier around it to keep him from falling in, just
as one would do with a swimming pool.  Or be sure that you
are out there with him but that has some risk as well if he gets
outside when you’re not looking, gets intrigued by something
in the water, and decides to go in after it.

Best to keep it shallow or inaccessible.

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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English Bulldogs Holiday Video – darned cute!

I was thrilled by all the bulldog photos sent in by my subscribers
of their bulldogs dressed in holiday garb, so I put together
a little Bulldog Holiday video.

All the photos are also on the VivyLand website,
but the video sure is cute if I do say so myself!

[display_podcast]

If you can’t see it here, view it on YouTube at this link:
Bulldog Holiday Video
and be sure to send it on to all your bulldog friends!

Happy Holidays from Jan & Archie!

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Dry Eye in Bulldog Who Had Cherry Eyes Removed

I was wondering if you have any remedies for a 5 yr old bulldog that has already
had eye surgery from previous owner but I do not know the DX, but his lids were cut.

He was fine for the first 6 months we had him and then this green/yellow goop
appeared on his eyes, almost like a cataract.  2 different vets said he had dry eye
and gave me optimmun 2X day

So many of your holistic remedies have worked great on him, wrinkles, tail etc
I was hoping you had some suggestions.  I clean his eyes 2X day with eye wash
and washcloth but probably about 4-5 X’s a day we have to wipe his eyes with
tissues to get goop out. I think it impares his vision as sometimes he runs into things.
Optimmun is just OK certainly not a remedy.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.  Thank you

Ellen

———-

Hi Ellen,

Have you been to an ophthalmologist specialist who could tell you for
sure what’s going on?

It sounds like he had cherry eye and their solution was to remove the
glands, which also make the tears for his eyes.  (I’d like to verbally thrash
the people that think this is a good solution for cherry eye) This type of surgical
removal of tear glands can lead to dry eye, infection, and loss of vision.

If his glads are gone, the Optimmun will not help restore them and the best
thing you could do is to put sterile eye drops (like for humans – not visine, but
just natural drops) into the corner of his eyes up to every two hours if possible.
It’s a lot of work, but the only solution I know of except a surgical procedure
that re-routes some of his saliva to the eye.  This would be expensive.

Here’s an article on dry eye with photos and solutions from a vet surgery
center.  I do think in your case the glad was removed so the Optimmun drug therapy
you are using (also mentioned here) would not work since he doesn’t have the
tear duct glands.
http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_kcs__dry_eye_.html

Again, an ophthalmologist could tell you if his tear duct glands have been removed.

I hope this helps.  Let me know how he’s doing.

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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Urinary Tract Infections in Bulldogs

I’ve had a few questions about urinary tract infections in bulldogs
recently, so I thought I’d post this informative article:

Canine Urinary Tract Infection – Is Your Dog at Risk?
By Laura Ramirez

It’s unbelievable to me that a canine urinary tract infection (UTI for short) -the most common health problem for dogs-is not something that most pet owners are taught to prevent. Since a bad infection can cause the kidneys to fail and your faithful, furry friend to die, it’s one of those measures, like brushing your dog’s teeth that you should consider part of your routine. In this article, you’ll learn why all breeds are at risk for dog urinary tract infection, what causes it and what you can do to prevent it.

What Causes Canine Urinary Tract Infection

Although an infection can start in any number of ways, the primary cause is bacteria in the bladder tube which can build up, especially in dogs who are left inside the house all day with no access to the yard. Since the urinary tract is made up of the kidneys, bladder and urethra, an infection in one area can quickly spread to other organs. If you’ve ever had an infection in this area yourself, you know how painful and life-threatening it can be.

Treating Dog Urinary Tract Infection

If you take your dog to a veterinarian, you will be given a prescription for antibiotics. However, just like in humans, antibiotics can have detrimental side effects. Obviously, if the antibiotics are worsening the symptoms or causing other problems, your dog cannot tell you.

As more and more human beings start taking their health into their own hands and seek natural treatments that have no side effects, increasingly, they want to do the same for beloved Fido. When looking for a remedy that will speed healing, look for one that can also be used for prevention. In herbal remedies, the following ingredients have been proven effective:

  • Arctostaphylos uva ursi – this is a tonic for the urinary tract which regulates pH levels.
  • Berberis vulgaris – restores the bladder.
  • Canthasris – helps soothe the bladder and promote healthy urine flow
  • Staphsagris – this remedy supports urogenital function (and is also a tonic for the prostate)

As mentioned above, make sure your supplement supports prevention and treatment. Since this is the most common problem in dogs, giving a daily dose to your dog could help extend his life.

If your dog has been diagnosed with a UTI and prescribed antibiotics, check with your vet before adding a supplement to ensure there will be no interactions. Of course, if you use a supplement to prevent dog urinary tract infection in the first place, you won’t have to be concerned about this.

Dogs are our loyal friends and are even more accepting of our flaws than people. There is a saying that beautifully expresses the adoration with which our dogs love us, “God, please make me into the person my dog thinks I am.” Although dogs never judge us, they do look to us to take care of them.

Now that you know that a canine urinary tract infection is preventable, take the steps to show how much you care.

Copyright 2008 by pet-ut-health.com.

Learn more about preventing and treating canine urinary tract infection by going to www.pet-ut-health.com.

Laura Ramirez is the author of the award-winning parenting book, Keepers of the Children: Native American Wisdom and Parenting. She is the publisher of Family Matters Parenting Magazine and has been a pet lover all her life.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Laura_Ramirez
http://EzineArticles.com/?Canine-Urinary-Tract-Infection—Is-Your-Dog-at-Risk?&id=1513856

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Stenotic Nares in English Bulldog

Can stenotic nares be identified without putting a bulldog under anesthesia?
————

Yes, they are readily visible in the nose,
I’ve attached two photo.  The bigger the
nares, the less air can come through the nostrils.

The second photo shows nares that are
blocking the nostrils and may be hampering breathing.
The first photo in my opinon shows normal bulldog nares.

If they are so big as to hamper breathing,
by actually closing the nasal opening,
some people have them surgically removed.

If they are not hampering your bulldog’s ability
to breathe, I would not recommend removing
them.  Any surgery on a bulldog involves risk.

There are a lot of vets who routinely recommend
removing nares and doing palate surgery, but I
think a lot of this is done for cosmetic reasons and
really don’t think for the most part this is necessary
since these are characteristics of the bulldog breed.

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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My Bulldog is Panting A Lot

Jan,

I’ve noticed this past few days, she’s been panting more so than usual.
Since I live in Arizona, I always leave her inside with the air condition at 79;
which I think is not to cold or to warm for her until I get home.
Should I take her to the vet and have her checked out or is this normal?

Jessica

———

Hi Jessica,

79 is ok for an English Bulldog that is just resting at home
while you’re at work, but it’s a bit hot if she gets excited
or runs around.

Heatstroke can occur in a bulldog at this temperature
if they run around too much and overexert.  It is very
difficult for a bulldog to cool down because they do not
have a normal nose, which provides cooling for a dog.

You could try setting the temp at 75 and see if she does better.
When you come home she gets excited and that can make
her pant more, especially when it’s hot.

If you turn down the A/C and she continues to pant, you could have
her checked out.  An underlying heart condition can make a
bulldog pant with little exertion.  But in your case, I suspect
it may be due to excitement at seeing you and nothing to worry about.
your bulldog pal,
Jan

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My English Bulldog Throws Up a Lot . . .

Hi Jan,

I was wondering if you could help me? Gracie my bulldog seems to throw up alot.
Is there something I can do?
Do you think there is something wrong with her?
I am very worried about her..
Thanks so much,
Janice
—-

Hi Janice,

It depends on what sort of vomiting.
There is a difference between vomiting and regurgitation.
If your dog is simply throwing up food right after eating,
food that has not been in the stomach, it is probably simple
regurgitation.

Bulldogs tend to gulp their food and sometimes eat so fast
that the food can’t get down the esophagus properly and
so they throw up.

There is a condition common in bulldogs called esophageal
motility disorder, where the normal constrictions of the
esophagus don’t work properly and cause the bulldog to
not “swallow” properly and often regurgitate.

There is a simple way to alleviate this condition that I
recommend in my book.  Elevate your bulldog’s food
dish.  This lets gravity take over and help get the food
down her throat.

To soothe an upset stomach you can feed her a little
canned pumpkin with her food – be sure it is pure
pumpkin and NOT pumpkin pie mix which is loaded
with sugar.

There are, however, other things that can cause vomiting,
including food allergies, metabolic disorders, ulcers, or
even obstructions in the throat, or if she has something
lodged in her stomach like a rawhide bone or teddy bear.

If you suspect she has eaten the stuffing out of a teddy
bear or a similar item, you can withhold her food for
about 7-8 hours.  Then give her some white bread with
the crust cut off.  It’s really gooey and can catch
what’s clogging her and pass it through.

Be sure she gets small amounts of water frequently
or sucks on an ice cube to keep her from getting
dehydrated.  Then give her a couple pieces of white
bread, broken up into small pieces.  This will bind with
the stuffing and allow it to pass through.  If she throws
this up as well, call your vet immediately.

Vomiting is characterized by the dog heaving for a while
before the stomach contents come up.  When they do, they
may also come through her nose.

If your dog has been vomiting blood or bile, you need to
take her to the vet right away.  Vomiting is dehydrating
which is very dangerous long term.

Throwing up can be an indication of serious illness in
the liver or kidneys or pancreas.  Your vet should be
able to do some simple tests to determine this.

If your bulldog has been “vomiting” for several days,
if she is still doing so, I think it advisable to take her to
the vet to make sure she does not have anything lodged in
her stomach or esophagus.  And make sure it is not a more
serious illness.

I hope this helps.  Let me know if you need some clarification.

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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Blood in My Bulldog’s Stool and Diarrhea

Jan, I have a question for you.

My 10 month old Enlish Bulldog (roxy) has been having a diarhea and a little blood in her stools for the past couple of days. We called our vet once we noticed it and he said that a little blood in her stoos is not uncommon and to try and give her pepto bismol tablets to see if that helps the diarhea issue.

We have been doing that for the last 36 hours and nothing has really changed. If anything, both symptoms have gotten a little worse. Roxy acts completely normal, plays all the time, and has lots of energy. Everything seems completely normal except for her stools.

We are currently out of town at my in laws house and my wife and I dont know what to do. We arent sure if we should just bite the bullet and go to the emergency vet (because it is on a Sunday). Has your dog been through this before? Any suggestions you can give me would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Ryan

Hi Ryan,

Blood in your bulldog’s stools is not necessarily an emergency,
and could indicate many things.

It depends what it looks like.  If it’s red and a little slimy, and stinky,
she could have gotten giardia or some other parasite.  These are
hard to diagnose because they come and go.  They do tend to
resolve themselves in time.

If it’s red and clotted, it indicates a more serious bleeding problem.
If it’s dark in color, it’s coming from further up the digestive tract.

She could have eaten the wrong thing and it’s irritated her stomach
or intestine.

Another thing that can cause diarrhea is food.  If your bulldog has
a food allergy, she could on occasion get bloody stools.

The main danger from untreated diarrhea, even if it’s not dangerous
diarrhea, is dehydration.  A lot of water leaves the system with diarrhea
and this is harmful to the internal organs.

Here’s a link to some useful information on different causes of blood in
a dog’s stool:
http://home.ivillage.com/pets/symsolve/0,,j6cd,00.html

My bulldog Archie had bloody stools off and on for a while.  He was
tested for all kinds of parasites twice and was clean.  The vet
said he could have irritable bowel syndrome, but I didn’t think that
sounded right.  It turned out to be a food allergy to chicken.
I changed his diet to exclude chicken and he’s been fine ever since.

My Vivy did have this but she was quite ill and was not acting normal.
She was also vomiting.  She was listless and uncomfortable as well.
It was obvious she was quite ill.
In her case it was pancreatitus which I think was caused by Rimadyl,
a nsaid she was given for arthritis.  This was an extreme case.

Personally, I always think it’s better to be safe than sorry with a bulldog.
If it doesn’t get better or resolve itself in the next day, or if she worsens
and starts to act uncomfortable or listless or vomiting, I would definitely
take her to the vet.  If she’s otherwise normal, you could wait until you
get home

You could try giving her some garlic, maybe half a clove crushed in her food.
It’s a potent short term immune booster.

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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Worrisome Dog Food Consolidation News

There have been many complaints about Canidae dog foods lately
especially their All Life Stages product.  Dogs that have been eating
it for years are suddenly having problems.

There was a formula change which is documented and touted as
a great improvement in holistic dog foods on their website

There is also a rumor that they were sold to Diamond Pet Foods.
I dug a little deeper and found that Canidae is in fact only using
Diamond as a processor of their foods. But that indicated to me
bigger and not necessarily better!

My specialty retailer told me the Canidae reps said the formula change
is due to the rice shortage. It is true there is a rice shortage, but
again the growth in size tells me they are ramping up to sell the company.

I used to be in the ad business and that is what a company often does
to promote a big buy out: increase output and market presence, like
when Wellness ramped up and started selling in big box retailers.

Now I’ve just heard that Nature’s Variety, my current favorite and
maker of Prairie, Instinct, and Raw Diets, has been sold to Berwind,
the same private company that purchased Wellness.

I’m sure we’ll be hearing more consolidation stories soon.

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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Excessive Hum*ping in Bulldog

I have a 7 month old English Bulldog who I love with all my heart….I have had several, but, I have never come across a male that was so se*ually excitable As Buster, He actually humps air….and anything else that he can…
I’m concerned.

Gary

—-

Hi Gary,

Some young bulldogs will get easily excited and hump the air.
This is usually just a phase that doesn’t last long (a month or two).

There is a danger that his pen*is could get stuck when it’s enlarged
and it can be painful.  Usually it resolves itself although he may
have difficulty even walking when this happens.  The little hairs on
the pupice curl in and keep the pen*is from being able to retract.

Here’s an explanation from www.lowchensaustralia.com/breeding/reprotract.htm:

During an erect*ion, the urethral gland on a dog’s pen*is can swell so much it is too wide to retract into the sheath. If the erect*ion is prolonged, the pen*is becomes dry and cannot be withdrawn. To treat this condition, lubricate the pen*is with water-soluble jelly and slide it back in its sheath. If this is not possible, keep it moistened with lubricant and get veterinary help.

If your bulldog tries to hu*mp people at this stage, you need to discourage
this kind of behavior or he will continue it his entire life.

To discourage it, you can either give him a verbal command if he will respond,
or squirt him with water and tell him firmly “no” when he attempt to hump a leg
or something.

In my experience this behavior is short lived.  When his testosterone stops
spiking, he will stop hump*ing the air.  And with firm, constant reprimands
for hump*ing a human, your English Bulldog will stop doing this as well.

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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What’s the Best Chew Toy for a Bulldog?

HI Jan,

Could you tell me a good chew toy for bulldogs? Seems like everything we
buy Gracie only has it a few days then its all chewed up.  I have to really
watch her cause she will even chew the chair I am sitting in.

She doesn’t seem to like the real hard rubber ones which do seem to last
longer. Any kind of raw hide makes her throw up.

Any suggestions would be a great help?

Thanks so much,
Janice

Hi Janice,

I have found that Kong chew toys are the most durable for bullies.  Have
you tried the ones where you put a treat inside?  Sometimes this will
attract them when the toy alone they don’t like.

If Gracie is chewing on the wrong things, like your furniture, you can rub a
little BenGay on the furniture.  They hate the taste.  You can also try
Bitter Apple, be sure to shake it before spraying or else she’ll think it’s
yummy.

Other brands that have done well for bulldogs are
-Nylaknot – nylabone’s extra tough line
-Sheepskin toys (be sure they cannot get the squeaker out and there are no
eyes that could be chewed out)
-Booda bones and ropes (be careful they can’t chew up the rope) – try the X-Large
Booda super 8 tug
-there is a rubber tug toy I’ve seen bulldogs playing tug-a-war with that seems to
last, called Invincible Chains Tug Toy – get the large one
-empty plastic water bottles (with cap, ring, and label removed) work really well,
my Archie loves them and the price is right!  Throw them out when they start to
show too much wear.

It’s ok for the dogs to play tug-a-war, but you should never let a human play tug
with them as it promotes a dominance instinct in the dog.

Rawhides, even the particle types are bad.  Rawhide expands in the stomach and can
kill a bulldog who swallows chunks of it.  Bulldogs gulp, they don’t really chew
their food.  Rope toys may be shredded and if they eat them, you can
get the same stomach problem.  So you need to keep an eye on them with a rope
toy.

A dog has a reflex at the back of the stomach that causes the to throw up
things that cannot be digested, but it does not always ensure your dogs
won’t be harmed by ingesting the wrong thing.

Never give a bulldog a greenie either, despite the new ads.  I’ve heard of
cases where a Greenie had to be surgically removed from a bulldog’s
stomach (at a cost of $3000).

good luck – bulldogs can destroy many chew toys in a matter of hours!

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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