Travel Training for You and Your Pets

One thing to always remember with a Bulldog is the problem of heat.  Bulldogs are very susceptible to heat stroke and can die in an environment that’s over 75 degrees, especially if in a stressful situation like an airplane cargo hold.  Bulldogs are Number 1 in deaths on airplanes!  read my earlier post:  http://www.askbulldoghealth.com/?p=142

Ask CVM: Travel Training for You and Your Pets

by Ashley Steel, Contributing Writer, Communications

With the summer months rapidly approaching, vacation season will soon be here. We all need a little time away from the monotony of an everyday routine, so as you get ready to retreat, it’s important to know how to care for your four-legged friends traveling with you. Most of us travel by car or plane, but each option brings certain drawbacks for pets.

Car Travel

Car travel is usually less stressful on pets because it allows Freckles and Champ to be close to you, so you can monitor their well-being and come to their aid when needed.  If you choose to drive to your destination, here are a few helpful hints to make the trip more enjoyable.

Motion sickness: It’s common for pets to experience motion sickness while traveling in a car. To help avoid an upset stomach, don’t feed your pet a large meal before travel. Cracking a window to allow fresh air to circulate through your vehicle also helps. If Champ is prone to motion sickness or if Freckles’ sensitive stomach acts up again, you may want to put them in the front seat next to you.  Riding up front helps because less motion is felt in the front of the vehicle.

Bathroom breaks: While Champ may snooze for the majority of the trip, it’s still important to give him frequent bathroom breaks. Traffic is unpredictable, so if it has been more than a couple of hours, stop and give your dog a chance to relieve himself and stretch his legs.

Sedatives: While sedatives may make your pet seem less stressed during car trips, these medications also have a tendency to dull the senses and lessen your pet’s ability to react to the environment, which can be dangerous in an emergency. When traveling by car or by plane, avoid giving your pet any type of sedative.  If you think Champ or Freckles really needs a sedative to travel, talk to your pet’s veterinarian before your trip.

Air Travel

For people, flying is often quicker and easier than driving, but flying can be a more stressful experience for your pet. If you decide to travel by air, it’s important to keep a few things in mind.

Cargo travel: While you’re snacking, reading, and sleeping in relative comfort up in economy seating, Champ is usually traveling in the cargo area below, subjected to temperature fluctuations and loud noises. A cat or small dog may be allowed to travel in the plane’s cabin, as long as the pet is kept in a crate and the crate fits underneath the seat.  Check with specific airlines for more information about cabin travel for your pet.

Check on your pet: Make sure to tell the plane’s Captain or flight attendant that you have a pet on board. If the flight staff knows about Champ in cargo, they are better able to check on him for you, especially if an unusual situation occurs, such as an unscheduled landing, extended taxi time, or long layover.

Walk your dog: If you and Champ have a connecting flight, try to walk him before that connecting flight departs. Many airports provide dog parks just outside the terminal. A bathroom break and a short walk will help Champ relax and stay calm during the remainder of his journey.

Crate your pet: During flights, most pets are housed in pet crates provided by their owners. It’s important to prepare your pet’s crate with safety in mind.  Pet crates should provide ample space for your pet to move around and should also meet the requirements set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA/APHIS) and the International Air Transportation Association (IATA).

When your pet is crated, remember to include:

  • A bowl of dry food;
  • A bowl or other container of frozen water that will melt over the course of the trip, giving your pet constant access to cold water;
  • Appropriate bedding, such as a soft towel or blanket, or shredded newspaper or wood chips if the traveling pet is a hamster, gerbil, or guinea pig; and
  • A label on the outside of the crate that is clearly marked with your pet’s name and your contact information.  You should include both your home contact information and your destination contact information.

Be Prepared: If you plan to stay in a hotel while traveling, contact the hotel ahead of time to make sure it is pet friendly.

Before your trip, research veterinary hospitals in the city or town of your destination in case of a pet emergency during the vacation.

Hawaii and Abroad: Traveling outside the continental United States with your pet requires advanced planning.  For international travel, contact the appropriate country’s embassy or consulate at least 4 weeks before your trip.  Different countries may require different documentation for your pet’s entry. The state of Hawaii also has entry requirements for arriving pets.

For more information about traveling with your pets, please check the following Web sites:

FDA Veterinarian Newsletter > Ask CVM: Travel Training for You and Your Pets.

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Medications for Your Pet … Questions for Your Vet

Medications for Your Pet … Questions for Your Vet

Questions you should ask your veterinarian when medication is prescribed

  1. Why has my pet been prescribed this medication and how long do I need to give it?

  1. How do I give the medication to my pet? Should it be given with food?

  1. How often should the medication be given and how much should I give each time? If it is a liquid, should I shake it first?

  1. How do I store the medication?

  1. What should I do if my pet vomits or spits out the medication?

  1. If I forget to give the medication, should I give it as soon as I remember or wait until the next scheduled dose? What if I accidently give too much?

  1. Should I finish giving all of the medication, even if my pet seems to be back to normal?

  1. Could this medication interact with other medications my pet is taking?

  1. What reactions should I watch for, and what should I do if I see any side effects?

  1. When should I bring my pet back for a recheck? Will you be calling me to check on my pet’s progress, or should I call you?

If you have any questions during your pet’s treatment, contact your veterinarian.

Center for Veterinary Medicine

Animal Health Literacy > Medications for Your Pet … Questions for Your Vet.

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Lump on Young Bulldog’s Neck

I was wondering, I know you have been through alot with your Bulldog Archie and I was wondering if he has ever happened to have a lump under his neck by where his collar would hang?

My fiance had noticed this lump on our mini bulldog Tuffy’s neck. He said he first noticed it about a couple of months ago and since has gotten a little bigger but tonight it looked like part of it was a scab & started to come off, so he cleaned it off with peroxide since it was bleeding.

We haven’t noticed a change in his personality or demenor but I have never seen or heard of anything like this. This is the only thing that could possibly be a genetic defect or something along that line as the only issue he has had was an allergic reaction to a flea medication.

He has been a really good & healthy dog but this worries me & we have an appointment for him on Monday but I was told that maybe it was a cut that got infected or a cyst that has gotten irritated. I guess basically I am hoping you might have heard or seen this before & can maybe put my mind at ease. Attached is a picture of what the lump looks like. I greatly appreciate any help or advice you can give.

sincerely,
Jen

Hi Jennifer,

That could be a histiocytoma, a benign tumor of the skin cells and is usually found on young dogs.  If that’s the case you do not need to have it removed as it will resolve itself on it’s own.  I think that peroxide might irritate it because it is quite drying.

My Archie had one on his upper neck when he was young.  It was quite gruesome looking especially to other pet owners.  My vet advised me to leave it alone and it went away after a couple months.

It’s still important to get a proper diagnosis from your vet.  Here’s a link to more information on histiocytomas:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histiocytoma_(dog)

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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Bulldog Vomiting and Diarrhea – Extreme Danger

My Bulldog Archie has just come home from a couple of days in the doggie
ICU. Here’s what happened.

Sunday night he vomited – no I don’t think it was the Superbowl ads 🙂
This is not out of the ordinary in a dog’s life. But then he vomited again at 1am, 3am and 5am. This was not ordinary.

At first I thought he had ingested a foreign object – he does like to chew.
And dogs have a reflex at the back of the stomach that will make them
vomit up something that’s trying to move through to the intestines.

But there was nothing in his vomit. By morning he was clearly not feeling
well. He wouldn’t eat or drink and was lethargic. Definitely bad signs.
Knowing that dehydration can be life threatening for a dog, I gave him
some water by pouring it in his mouth.

I called my vet and took him in. There are some things that you just can’t
take care of at home. They did x-rays and didn’t see any objects in his
intestines but did see an enlarged area.

They said I could take him home and monitor him but because of the danger
of dehydration I decided to let them put him on an IV drip in the ICU.

Boy am I glad I did because they called that evening and said he had vomited
two more times and then overnight he started having bloody diarrhea.

Luckily his blood work was “perfect” except for a high blood protein level
consistent with dehydration.

The vomiting stopped but the diarrhea went on for the next day and then
he gradually started to improve.

They thought he had a condition called Hemorrhagic Gastroenteritis HGE
which is a fancy name for bloody diarrhea from inflamed intestines.

Now he’s back home and resting (a lot) comfortably.

The lesson here is that if your dog vomits more than once and especially if
it’s accompanied by diarrhea and lethargy and no interest in food, it’s
imperative to get him to the vet immediately.

When a dog dehydrates (this also applies to overheating that can lead to
Heat Stroke) the blood starts to thicken and he goes into shock. The thick
blood will start to make small clots and lead to organ failure and death. If
this clotting starts it is irreversible.

If you want to read more about HGE, the Whole Dog Journal has a very good
article on it at this link:
http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/12_7/features/Dog_16136-1.html

Yes, it was expensive and I do have pet insurance which I’m hoping will
cover it. And yes, it could recur. But if I had waited a day to see if he would
get better he probably would have died. And that would have been tragic.

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Reverse Sneeze Often Occurs in Bulldogs – video

If your Bulldog has ever had a reverse sneezing episode you know that it can cause panic in the viewer.  My  English Bulldog Vivy had them fairly regularly which I attributed to her elongated palate.  When she did this I would hold her head up and stroke her throat from the chest area up towards her head and she would usually stop.

Here’s a good explanation of a reverse sneeze and a video demonstration.

“Reverse sneezing” occurs when a dog feels a tickling sensation in the back of their throat. It is somewhat equivalent to a person clearing their throat. However, when dogs reverse sneeze, the symptoms appear ridiculously overly dramatic. They assume a stiff posture with head and neck rigidly extended forward. This is accompanied by forceful, noisy inhalation and exhalation that can last for several seconds, even minutes. Check out the example of reverse sneezing in the video below.

Here are some examples of other behaviors/symptoms that should prompt you to grab your cell phone and shoot some video (if you can think of others, please let me know):

1. Weakness
2. Trembling
3. Incoordination
4. Falling down/collapse
5. Episodes of pain
6. Symptoms associated with passing urine or stool
7. Making odd noises (in this situation audio taping is a must along with video)
8. Coughing (again, adding audio is great)
9. Labored breathing
10. Limping/lameness
11. Odd behavior

Videotaping for Your Vet « speakingforspot.com.

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Dr Khuly’s 7 Favorite Home Remedies

Dr Khuly is a pet advocate and vet who is very passionate about animal rights and proper dog care.  In this blog post she writes about her favorite home remedies for pets.  I’ve used some of these on my Bulldog and even learned about some new ones.

  1. Epsom salts for swelling
  2. Chamomile tea as natural disinfectant
  3. Petroleum jelly to help move unwanted stuff through the intestines
  4. Canned Pumpkin for constipation or diarrhea
  5. Borax powder for flea control
  6. Oatmeal Cereal bath for itchy dog
  7. Hydrogen Peroxide and Baking Soda for odor control, including skunk

To read details follow this link:
My top seven favorite home remedies | PetMD.

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Concerning Vaccinations for Your Bulldog

My Bulldog Archie had a bad reaction to his last rabies vaccine and I have serious doubts about my local laws about rabies vaccination frequency.  Since he lives in an urban area with very minimal exposure to wild creatures who could carry rabies, I’m reluctant to re-vaccinate.

The Rabies Titer Test is a good way to find out if your dog really needs a rabies booster (see #5 below), but there’s more to this story and Dr Kay has a good article stating other considerations for vaccination, including:

  1. Educate yourself about available canine vaccinations and the diseases they are capable of preventing (in some cases treating the disease, should it arise, might be preferable to the risks and expense associated with vaccination). Learn about duration of vaccine protection and potential side effects.
  2. Figure out which diseases your dog has potential exposure to.
  3. lert your veterinarian to any symptoms or medical issues your dog is experiencing.  It is almost always best to avoid vaccinating a sick dog — better to let his immune system concentrate on getting rid of a current illness rather than creating a vaccine “distraction.”
  4. Let your vet know if your dog has had vaccine side effects in the past. If the reaction was quite serious, she may recommend that you forego future vaccinations, necessitating an official letter to your local government agency excusing your pup from rabies• related requirements
  5. Consider vaccine serology for your dog.  This involves testing a blood sample from your dog to determine if adequate vaccine protection still exists (remember, vaccine protection for the core diseases lasts a minimum of three years).  While such testing isn’t perfect, in general if the blood test indicates active and adequate protection, there is no need to vaccinate.
  6. Ask your veterinarian about the potential side effects of proposed vaccinations

Read the entire article:
Vaccinations for Your Dog: A Complex Issue « speakingforspot.com.

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Bulldog Adoption and Rescue Scams

Bulldog Rescue is a noble profession and has many dedicated honest people who work tirelessly to save our breeds from harm.  That’s why it’s so disheartening to find unscrupulous puppy mill breeders who exploit innocent folks who just want a bulldog.  I found this post in the Frog Dog Blog

“Avoiding this scam: Learn to differentiate between a real rescue group, and a company selling puppies. A legitimate rescue will be well organized, well established, and often times a registered charity. There will hardly ever be cute young puppies available, since there’s no lack of homes waiting for adorable puppies. Most rescue dogs are older, with many in need of veterinary care.”

Read entire post here:

Wendy Faith Laymon and “Fake” Rescue a French Bulldog | Frogdog Blog – A French Bulldog Breeder’s Blog.

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French Bulldog Paw Licking and Allergies

Hi Jan,

My French bulldog is 13 months old.  We have been battling some skin issues
with her since she was 5 months old.  It started with a yeast infection in
her right ear.  Since then she ahs had 3 infections in the same ear.  We try
prescription washes and solutions, with little help of preventing the
situation or solving the issue.  She also has a severe paw licking issue,
and gets a pimple looking rash on the hairless part of her belly.  We feel
bad for her and want to resolve this issue for her sake.

I started her as a pup on the Whole Pet Diet, then moved onto the B.A.R.F.
diet, and now per my vets request Royal Canine Hypo- Allergenic Hydrolyzed
Protein dog food.

The same symptoms have persisted.
We have had snow for about a month and I noticed that my dog wasn’t liking
her paws as much.  I am starting to believe that she is allergic to grass.
The second the snow melted away and grass appeared, her belly broke out in a
rash again and the paw licking started up again.

My husband wants to treat her with the allergy injections, but it is costly.
What would you recommend for your frenchie?

Thanks,
Sara

—-

Hi Sara,

I have a couple suggestions.  First, do not feed her that Royal Canin
formula, it’s soy and I don’t think dogs are meant to eat soy.  Feed her
something high quality (raw or other) that is not chicken based but
rather venison or duck or salmon, etc.
Next, her condition could be contact allergies since she’s better in
the snow when her paws get cleaned off.  Be sure you are not using
any harsh chemicals anywhere she walks.  Clean her bedding once
a week with dye and chemical free detergent.
You can give her the allergy shots and she will look better for a while.
But they are steroids and have very bad long term effects.  I do not
recommend them except maybe for a very short time to get severe
allergies under control.
Try giving her dye free children’s dose of Benadryl (pink box) instead.
For her ears, be sure you keep them dry.  Yeast thrives on moisture.
Try using an ear cleaner like Oti-Clens several times a day until her
symptoms subside.  It’s available at pet stores, follow directions on box.
Do not over bathe her, it will only increase allergic problems.
I have a lot more suggestions on how to treat allergies plus food
recommendations in my French Bulldog Health System.
your bulldog pal,
Jan
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Hair Falling Out Around French Bulldog’s Eyes

Hello Jan,

My name is Erica I have a 81/2month old brindle frenchie lately I’ve noticed around her eyes she seems to be loosing hair and today one of her eyes looks a little puffy. I use puppy wipes to clean her face but have stopped using them just in case I didn’t know if it was from the wipes or maybe her food. We use  purina pro plan just wondering what I could do at home first to prevent going to the vet.

Thanks, Erica

Hi Erica,

From your description & your dog’s age that sounds like an outbreak of demodectic mange or a proliferation of mites.  Mites normally live peacefully on a dog’s skin but can get out of hand and start to multiply.  Since they live in the base of the hair follicle they will cause the hair to fall out.  Around the eyes is one of the places it shows up.

Most cases of mites will resolve themselves on their own with no treatment.  It is difficult to treat by the eyes because most products should not be allowed in eyes.

Diet is important in your dog’s immune system’s ability to fight off invaders like mites.  I would suggest you get a higher quality diet for your Frenchie.  Go to your local specialty dog food store (not a big box store) and get a human grade food made with no corn, no wheat, no soy, no chicken.  Try a lamb and rice formula I recommend in my book such as Prairie or a fish diet like Taste of the Wild.

Good luck – keep me posted.

Your Bulldog Pal,

Jan

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Mange in Bulldog – Hereditary or Stress Related?

I am getting a one year old frenchie and they said that she has stress mange and that it is haredity. vet said that spaying her should fix it so the people have had her spayed is this true will that stop her mange just wondered

It will help but it may not stop it.  Stress is definitely a factor is the health
of a dog, especially when it comes to skin disorders.  Mange occurs when
otherwise harmless little parasites live at the base of the hair follicules of
a dog.  When immunity is compromised these little critters multiply and
take over, destroying the base of the hair follicules and causing hair loss
and a ratty look.
Mange can be passed on from mother dog to pup although most breeders
would not allow this to occur.  Mange or demodex as it’s called in young
dogs may resolve itself on its own or may need treatment which usually
consists of a course of Ivermectin.
It can go away on it’s own in a couple months in a healthy dog but a
bulldog with a compromised immune system will need treatment.
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Help – My French Bulldog Puppy is Deaf.

hi jan

i’ve been speaking to you here and there   you’ve been helping me out  with lots of questions etc  well now  this  weekend  we  just found out that our new little puppy is totally deaf  help  ouch  what do we do about this
i’ve been looking around on the computer etc  and i see that there are  books and lots of information on this so i am not so scared seems as though we may be able to do this  i hope  are we panicking  or what  i’ve notified the breeder that we purchased him from and i haven’t heard back from him yet  because the computer also said to be sure and to notify the breeder so i guess maybe that they would stop breeding that female i think is what it said so i did notify them and mention all of this to them so we’ll see what they come back with.
have you ever had a deaf dog   have you ever trained one  i’m seeing  on the computer that there are hand signals so guess that we will go to that  what info can you give me  thanks  g  maybe just don’t panick and educate huh hand signals take care keeping in mind that he cannot hear be very careful etc gosh i am scared
thanks g

Hi G,

I’m sorry to hear your little guy is deaf but it’s not as bad as you may imagine.
Dogs approach the world primarily through smell, then sight, then hearing.  He
will look to you for direction so you just need to use consistent hand signals.
One of my dogs went deaf when she was older and we didn’t know it for a long
time because I had trained her by voice while using my hands.
In fact I try to be as quiet around my dogs as I can as then they will be calmer.
I use hand signals to sit, come, stay.  It’s not as scary as it seems – he will
learn right away.  Again, consistency is very important: use the same signal
for each command each time.
The main problems arise when he’s outside.  He won’t hear cars coming, but
then dogs are not the smartest about cars.  He will still pick up the scent of
everything around him.
There are many books on the subject although I do not have one in particular
to recommend.  What I would recommend is you find a good trainer who can
help you with this.
Deafness in bulldogs is not especially common but it does occur with more
frequency with all white dogs.
I hope this helps.  Please let me know how it goes.
Your Bulldog Pal,
Jan
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French Bulldog Paw Licking and Allergies

Hi Jan,

My French bulldog is 13 months old.  We have been battling some skin issues with her since she was 5 months old.  It started with a yeast infection in her right ear.  Since then she ahs had 3 infections in the same ear.  We try prescription washes and solutions, with little help of preventing the situation or solving the issue.

She also has a severe paw licking issue, and gets a pimple looking rash on the hairless part of her belly.  We feel bad for her and want to resolve this issue for her sake. I started her as a pup on the Whole Pet Diet, then moved onto the B.A.R.F. diet, and now per my vets request Royal Canine Hypo- Allergenic Hydrolyzed Protein dog food. The same symptoms have persisted.

We have had snow for about a month and I noticed that my dog wasn’t liking her paws as much.  I am starting to believe that she is allergic to grass. The second the snow melted away and grass appeared, her belly broke out in a rash again and the paw licking started up again.

My husband wants to treat her with the allergy injections, but it is costly. What would you recommend for your frenchie?

Thanks, Sara

—-

Hi Sara,

I have a couple suggestions.  First, do not feed her that Royal Canin formula, it’s soy and I don’t think dogs are meant to eat soy.  Feed her something high quality (raw or other) that is not chicken based but rather venison or duck or salmon, etc.

Next, her condition could be contact allergies since she’s better in the snow when her paws get cleaned off. Be sure you are not using any harsh chemicals anywhere she walks.  Clean her bedding once a week with dye and chemical free detergent.

You can give her the allergy shots and she will look better for a while. But they are steroids and have very bad long term effects.  I do not recommend them except maybe for a very short time to get severe allergies under control.

Try giving her dye free children’s dose of Benadryl (pink box) instead.

For her ears, be sure you keep them dry.  Yeast thrives on moisture. Try using an ear cleaner like Oti-Clens several times a day until her symptoms subside.  It’s available at pet stores, follow directions on box.

Do not over bathe her, it will only increase allergic problems.

I have a lot more suggestions on how to treat allergies plus food recommendations in my French Bulldog Health System.

your bulldog pal,
Jan

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French Bulldog with Severe Allergies – Any Suggestions?

Thank you for such a quick response.  I look forward to any information you might have regarding the “frenchie”.

My little bulldog is miserable.  Her one ear continually has a redness to it, causing her to shake her head.  I take her to the vet and she is prescribed anitbiotics and ear drops.  It goes away for a short time then it returns.

She is constantly doing the sit and spin.  Her eyes are watery.  She constantly licks her paws which are red and inflamed.  And occasionally, her underbelly toward her back legs breaks out in a rash with little red bumps.

I recently stopped giving her processed or purchased dog food and started making meals for her myself.  I omitted anything to do with corn, included baby food, brown rice and hamburger or chicken with shredded vegies or potatoes.  It appeared as though she was getting better, then all of a sudden it all comes back again.

I bathe her once a week with oatmeal soap to keep her clean enough to know that her fur is not collecting anything.  She is primarily an inside dog and goes outside occasionally.

Someone suggested a product that I can purchase on line that controls the yeast levels.  Do you know anything about this?

Judy

—-

Hi Judy,

That certainly sounds like allergies.  Keep up with the healthy food, it can
take a while.  Paw licking is the definitive sigh of allergies.
The rash could be the result of a “contact allergy” in which she lays on
something that irritates her belly.  Eliminate any harsh detergents and
get the ‘free and clear’ version, and don’t use any dryer softening towels.
Same with carpet cleaners & floor cleaners – nothing harsh.
I’d recommend you continue with the ear drops in case there is yeast
building up.  Clean them daily as the head shaking has to do with yeast
deep in the ear canal.  And you can treat the patch on the ear with a
soothing ointment.
Sitting and spinning is a sign of either yeast in the tail pocket or the
need to express the anal glands.  You can clean her tail with some witch
hazel on a cotton pad daily.
There is a simple home remedy I have used with my bulldog to help
control yeast.  Add 1 Tbs Braggs apple cider vinegar (available at natural
foods stores) to her water bowl each time you fill it up.  It changes the
ph balance and can help control the growth of yeast.
Also, you might want to reduce the amount of bathing as it can actually
dry out the skin and contribute to irritations.
And when she takes antibiotics be sure to give her some probiotics
(human or dog variety) or a little yogurt with live cultures to help counteract
the effect of the antibiotics.
Finally, has she been checked for mites?  Demodex is very common in
young dogs and a simple skin scraping by your vet will rule this out.  They
will cause little bumps and make small areas of hair fall out.  Often they
resolve on their own within a month and no medications are necessary.
your bulldog pal,
Jan
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Where Can I Get A French Bulldog?

Hi Jan,

I really want to get a female puppy from a quality breeder or rescue.
Do you have any suggestions?  I have looked at what seems like 10,000
puppies on the internet, tried to get as much information that I could,
I have taken all kinds of internet quizzes and really just want to make
sure I get a healthy wonderful little puppy.

Do you have a breeder you would suggest?  I would consider rescuing
one but really want to have my first frenchie be all my own you know.

How would you suggest I go about getting something like an eight week
old female pied with a cute little dot on the top of her head?  I know it
sounds specific, but man are they cute.

Thanks again,

Tim

——–

Hi Tim,

Do not get one on the internet – there are too many scams and puppy mills.
Start by going to the French Bulldog Club of America site, at this link:
http://www.frenchbulldogclub.org/

Look under events and see if any are listed in your area.  Then you can see
the dogs and breeders in person.  You could also go to a Bulldog show
because the bulldog breeders often know or also breed Frenchies.

If there are no upcoming events, look in their breeder directory at this link.
http://www.frenchbulldogclub.org/ht/d/sp/i/310/pid/310

You can also go to local French Bulldog meetup groups or local clubs.
These you can find by doing a google search for French Bulldogs plus
your city name.

You will be surprised how much information you can get from Frenchie
owners that you just talk to on the street.

Choose the breeder carefully.  Frenchies do have significant health issues
and can be costly if they become ill.

Jan

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